Tag Archives: environment

Banff National Park, from fall, winter, summer in 2 days

Fall colors, Vermillion Lakes

We all know weather in the Canadian Rockies can change at the drop of a hat.  On a very recent trip over a two day period, we arrived to rainy, foggy and overcast skies.  The following day we had a large dumping of very wet snow, temperatures well below freezing, this included power failure and satellite failure in our hotel.  The next day the snow melted and soon after, sunny mid July conditions prevailed, with the temperature approaching 20 Celsius.

Fresh snowfall, Vermillion Lakes

Clearing skies, Vermillion Lakes

Clear blue sky, Peyto Lake

Blue-Green Algae on Lake Winnipeg, Victoria Beach

Blue-Green Algal bloom’s have appeared on Victoria Beach and many of Lake Winnipeg’s eastern beaches in the more populous south basin.  The result of elevated levels of phosphorous and nitrogen in the lake.  As levels rise and with the reduced natural filtering effects of marshlands, the problem will only worsen.  I’ve shot here several times without the algae present and came away with some wonderful lake images, but the past weekend really reminds us all of the concerted effort required to keep this very important water body healthy.  Lake Winnipeg has an immense watershed stretching from the Rocky Mountains to within mere miles of Lake Superior, and includes four US states.  The Red River brings the majority of nutrients into the lake, so it is an issue requiring inter-provincial and international cooperation.  Not an easy task, but local Manitoban’s can avail themselves of some useful information, from sites dedicated to Lake Winnipeg, such as The Lake Winnipeg Research Consortium or the blog  H2O: Ideas & Action for Canada’s Water

Sunset over Lake Winnipeg, Victoria Beach

Manitoba Hydro Place, Winnipeg, one of the planet’s greenest office towers

The 23 story headquarters of Manitoba Hydro in downtown Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.  Considered one of the worlds most environmentally friendly office towers.   Technologies employed include;  geothermal heating, radiant cooling, windows that open and a solar chimney to improve air circulation.  The building is highly automated and reportedly uses 60 percent less energy than a conventional building of similar size.  All this in the climate extremes of Winnipeg, which has very wide seasonal temperature fluctuations.